AWS Solution Architect Associate Exam Study Notes: Route 53

 

These notes were written while working through the A Cloud Guru AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate online course. These notes are partly from the videos, and also from various other online sources. Primarily, they’re notes for me, but you might find them useful too.

Since the AWS platform is changing so quickly, it’s possible that some of these notes may be out of date, so please take that into consideration if you are reading them.

 

Read More...


AWS Solution Architect Associate Exam Study Notes: EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud), and Lambda

 

These notes were written while working through the A Cloud Guru AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate online course. These notes are partly from the videos, and also from various other online sources. Primarily, they’re notes for me, but you might find them useful too.

Since the AWS platform is changing so quickly, it’s possible that some of these notes may be out of date, so please take that into consideration if you are reading them.

 

Read More...


AWS Solution Architect Associate Exam Study Notes: VPC (Virtual Private Cloud)

 

These notes were written while working through the A Cloud Guru AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate online course. These notes are partly from the videos, and also from various other online sources. Primarily, they’re notes for me, but you might find them useful too.

Since the AWS platform is changing so quickly, it’s possible that some of these notes may be out of date, so please take that into consideration if you are reading them.

 

Read More...


AWS Solution Architect Associate Exam Study Notes: S3 (Simple Storage Service), CloudFront and Storage Gateway

 

These notes were written while working through the A Cloud Guru AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate online course. These notes are partly from the videos, and also from various other online sources. Primarily, they’re notes for me, but you might find them useful too.

Since the AWS platform is changing so quickly, it’s possible that some of these notes may be out of date, so please take that into consideration if you are reading them.

 

Read More...


AWS Solution Architect Associate Exam Study Notes: IAM (Identity and Access Management)

 

These notes were written while working through the A Cloud Guru AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate online course. These notes are partly from the videos, and also from various other online sources. Primarily, they’re notes for me, but you might find them useful too.

Since the AWS platform is changing so quickly, it’s possible that some of these notes may be out of date, so please take that into consideration if you are reading them.

 

Read More...


AWS Solution Architect Associate Exam Study Notes: 10,000 Foot Overview

 

These notes were written while working through the A Cloud Guru AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate online course. These notes are partly from the videos, and also from various other online sources. Primarily, they’re notes for me, but you might find them useful too.

Since the AWS platform is changing so quickly, it’s possible that some of these notes may be out of date, so please take that into consideration if you are reading them.

 

Read More...


Setting web.config defaultProxy with Powershell for debugging .NET web services

 

Fiddler is an awesome tool for debugging web services. For the last 10 years, I’ve been using it virtually every working day for web service debugging in scenarios such as:

  • Capturing HTTP requests as they travel through a distributed system, which you have set up on your local development machine.
  • Intercepting and modifying HTTP requests, essentially performing a local man-in-the-middle interception. This is particularly useful if want to modify HTTP requests to simulate functionality which isn’t currently present, modify HTTP headers, etc.
  • Replaying captured requests - useful if you are debugging the way a web service behaves, given a specific request; capture the request, and replay it as many times as you need in order to debug the error.

If you’re doing any work with web services, Fiddler is definitly worth considering. Setting it up is fairly straightfoward

By default, Fiddler can update your browser proxy to route through the Fiddler proxy, which is, by default on port 8888, and will capture requests between Chrome/Firefox/Safari/etc, and your web app.

What if you’re debugging locally, and want to intercept .NET services which call other web services? i.e. Web Browser -> Web App -> Service1 -> Service2 (the one you want to debug)? This can be done by setting defaultProxy in web.config. In this case, since we want to debug Service2, we’d set defaultProxy in Service2’s web.config file.

i.e.

<configuration>
 <system.net>
  <defaultProxy>
   <proxy bypassonlocal="false" usesystemdefault="true" />
  </defaultProxy>
 </system.net>
</configuration>

With one of the distributed apps I frequently work with, I was setting, and resetting the web.config defaultProxy fairly frequently. To save some effort, I wrote a script to automate the change.

 

Read More...


dotnet new causing segmentation fault on Debian Linux

 

Earlier this evening I installed .NET core preview 2 on Debian Sid, and tried to create a new project via the dotnet new command, only to get a segmention fault error message:

[email protected]:~/git/testproject$ dotnet new console
Segmentation fault

In this instance, the segmentation fault on creation of a new project was is due to .NET Core telemetry being incompatible with version 1.1 of OpenSSL.

 

Read More...


Writing a method that takes an integer, and returns it's factorial

 

Sometimes, when being interviewed for a job as a software developer, you’ll be asked a question such as “write a method that takes an integer as a parameter, and returns it’s factorial.”

For example, the factorial of 3 is represented as “3!”, which is calculated via 3*2*1, which equals 6. 4! is 4*3*2*1, which is 24, etc.

Putting aside whether these kinds of questions should be asked in an interview, if they’re asking you this, there’s a fairly high likelihood they’re asking for you to show that you understand recursion. If that’s the case, no problem, something like this will calculate the factorial:

let rec factorial n =
    match n with
    | 0 | 1 -> 1
    | n when n > 0 && n <= 12 -> n * factorial (n - 1)
    | _ -> failwith "Parameter n is out of the supported range. Must be between 0 and 12."

This can be run in the F# interactive shell via:

> factorial 3;;
val it : int = 6

But what if they want to find out whether you:

  1. Understand recursion, and…
  2. Know when you can avoid recursion, and just write simple methods instead.

 

Read More...