A collection of 5 things from the week that I found interesting, am enjoying, or am working on.

This week:

  • Sometimes Netflix preview images and descriptions get out of sync, creating amusing mashups
  • Troy Hunt’s tips on personal finance for technology professionals
  • Patrick McKenzie on: Should you choose a commercial license or donation model to monetise your open source project?
  • A great thread discussing when to practice TDD (Test Driven Development)
  • Blender 3D tutorial: Create a Modern Bedroom in Blender in 35 Minutes

Netflix preview images and descriptions sometimes get out of sync, creating amusing mashups

A while back,l it was Barney and Friends:

Now it’s Marie Kondo’s “Tidying Up”:

The preview image is from a great film featuring Noomi Rapace (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) called “Close

Troy Hunt wrote: 10 personal finance lessons for technology professionals

Favorite quote:

If you don't have a vision of where you're going, if you don't have a goal where you go, you drift around and you never end up anywhere.

Read more in Troy’s Blog

Patrick McKenzie on: Should you choose a commercial license or donation model for your open source project?

We don't donate to OSS software which we use, because we're legally not allowed to

Patrick McKenzie writes about how to make it easier to make money from your open source project by adding a commercial license, which can simply be your existing open source license, along with an invoice.

Dan Abramov’s Twitter thread on TDD (Test Driven Development)

Here’s a great thread started by Dan Abramov (Creator or Redux, and currently one of the developers behind React), on how he writes tests early in the development process, but not before prototyping to clarify what he wants.

Create a Modern Bedroom in Blender in 35 Minutes

Blender is an absolutely free, open source 3D creation suite. I’ve used it for a bunch of projects such as this one, which I created back in 2013.

Blender has come a long way since then, and it’s much easier to create 3D scenes.

Here’s a recent, fairly advanced tutorial showing what you can do once you get past the initial learning curve:

If you want to get started with Blender, I recommend you check out the Blender Beginner Tutorial Series over at Blender Guru.

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